LIU KANG (1911-2004)
LIU KANG (1911-2004)
LIU KANG (1911-2004)
2 更多
LIU KANG (1911-2004)

Adjusting The Waistband

细节
118.5 x 170 cm. (46 5⁄8 x 66 7⁄8 in.)
来源
Private Collection, Singapore
出版
National Arts Council and National Heritage Board, LIU KANG AT 87, exh. cat., Singapore, Singapore Art Museum, 1997 (illustrated, p. 86).
Museum of Tolerance and Singapore Soka Association, Liu Kang at 90 - A Celebration of Singapore’s Treasured Artist, exh. cat., Los Angeles, Simon Wiesenthal Center Museum of Tolerance, 2000 (illustrated, p. 85).
National Art Gallery, Singapore, Liu Kang: Colourful Modernist, exh. cat., Singapore, Singapore Art Museum, 2011 (illustrated, p. 167).
展览
Singapore, Singapore Art Museum, National Arts Council and National Heritage Board, LIU KANG AT 87, 1997.
Los Angeles, Simon Wiesenthal Center Museum of Tolerance, Museum of Tolerance and Singapore Soka Association, Liu Kang at 90 - A Celebration of Singapore’s Treasured Artist, May – July 2000.
Singapore, Singapore Art Museum, National Art Gallery, Singapore, Liu Kang: A Centennial Celebration, July – October 2011.

荣誉呈献

Jacky Ho (何善衡)
Jacky Ho (何善衡) Head of Evening Sale

查阅状况报告或联络我们查询更多拍品资料

登入
浏览状况报告

拍品专文

Christie’s is thrilled to offer Adjusting the Waistband, the largest work by Liu Kang (1911-2004) to ever be auctioned thus far. This museum-quality painting is the culmination of decades of foundational work, research and breakthroughs by the artist. The specific attention to detail, representation and execution makes this a considerable masterpiece. This is further supported by its visibility to the public: included in key museum exhibitions and extensively published, it was also reproduced on limited edition Mass Rapid Transit (MRT) cards in Singapore. Painted in 1997, Liu was 86 years of age when he completed this painting; it was known that his eyesight was deteriorating, and yet he was truly able to put forth one of his best creations.

The life of Liu Kang is extraordinary; born in the final year of the last Chinese imperial dynasty, he survived both World War I and II, migrated six times, pioneered Modern Art in Singapore, taught art for 38 years, co-founded the Singapore Art Society in 1949, was appointed Chairman of the Visual Art Advisory Committee in 1978, won three awards for recognition of his service to society, and donated the majority of this life’s work (over 1,000 paintings and sketches) to the Singapore Art Museum in 2003.

Liu Kang’s life is a celebration of artistic discovery and creative visions. As his mentor, prominent painter and art educator Liu Haisu mentioned in a dedication: “There is a sense of freshness unique to Kang’s art, pure, bright and yet mellow. His use of line work and colours clearly displays the artist’s masterly control. His paintings draw on the vitality of real life but transcend above real life.” He had been acquainted with traditional culture since a young age, and throughout the years sought to incorporate his understanding of modern western art in his work. It was a rewarding journey of integrating this, his attraction to the post-impressionist (Cézanne, Gauguin, Van Gogh) and fauvist (Matisse) movement, then later the influence of his seminal trip to Bali in 1952. The interpretation he offered to the art world was significant and paved the way for what we now know as the ‘Nanyang’ (Southeast Asian) style.

Fully appreciating Adjusting the Waistband comes with understanding Bali’s impact on Liu Kang and his love for drawing. ‘Drawn from Life’ published in 2002 by the Singapore Art Museum presents an exemplary summary of what ‘drawing’ meant to the artist and outlined the relevance of preparatory studies and sketches in his oeuvre. Travelling to Bali with his contemporaries, Cheong Soo Pieng, Chen Wen Hsi and Chen Chong Swee in the early 50s (discussed at length in ‘Liu Kang: Colourful Modernist’ published by National Gallery, Singapore in 2011) was fueled by a remark by Charlie Chaplin which he took to heart: “Whoever has not been to Bali cannot say that he has been to Southeast Asia’. Liu Kang keenly absorbed the rich culture, art and architecture of the place, following which Balinese women became the most depicted subject matter in his work.

The present lot is a compelling portrayal of a simple but dynamic ‘daily life’ scene where three Balinese ladies are dressed in their traditional batik costumes, poised in three different stances, and adorned with three different hairdos. Two pen on paper sketches done in 1970 and 1987, a 1952 charcoal on paper sketch, and a 1997 watercolour painting kept in the same collection underline the extensive research to achieve this masterpiece. Adjusting the Waistband speaks volumes about the charming way of life of the beauties. Liu Kang captures the graceful essence through his vibrant composition, spirited colour palette, attention to crucial Balinese themes and detailed use of decorative motifs such as the precious tiger pendant necklace and patterned fabrics. The subtle ‘flamboyancy’ pays tribute to the artistic genius of Liu Kang.

更多来自 二十及二十一世纪艺术 晚间拍卖

查看全部
查看全部