A SILVER INCENSE BURNER OF A HAWK
A SILVER INCENSE BURNER OF A HAWK
A SILVER INCENSE BURNER OF A HAWK
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A SILVER INCENSE BURNER OF A HAWK
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A SILVER INCENSE BURNER OF A HAWK

MEIJI PERIOD (LATE 19TH CENTURY), SIGNED KAZUAKI

细节
A SILVER INCENSE BURNER OF A HAWK
MEIJI PERIOD (LATE 19TH CENTURY), SIGNED KAZUAKI
The silver incense burner finely cast and chiseled in the form of a hawk perched on a lacquered stand, gilt feet and wing details, the back of the hawk opening to reveal the interior, the eyes embellished with inlaid gilt and shakudo, the claws of hint and middle toes on the standing foot are moveable; with silver lining; signed on interior of the opening part
19 7/8 in. (50.5 cm.) high including stand

荣誉呈献

Takaaki Murakami (村上高明)
Takaaki Murakami (村上高明) Vice President, Specialist and Head of Department | Korean Art

拍品专文

The Chronicles of Japan (Nihon shoki), dating back to the eighth century, mention that the practice of hawking was introduced in the fourth century. Following its introduction, hawking gained significance as a seasonal activity at the royal court. Starting from the Muromachi period (1392-1573), hawking was predominantly adopted by the warrior elite. They perceived birds of prey as symbols of their own bravery and strength. This symbolism was so potent that the shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu (1542–1616) went as far as banning hawk trade in 1604 to underscore his hegemony. Depictions of hawks in various settings—be it in their natural habitat, in cages, or tethered to stands—abound in hanging scrolls, screens, and sliding doors commissioned by the samurai elite.

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