A HANIWA EARTHENWARE HEAD OF A MAN
A HANIWA EARTHENWARE HEAD OF A MAN
A HANIWA EARTHENWARE HEAD OF A MAN
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A HANIWA EARTHENWARE HEAD OF A MAN
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A HANIWA EARTHENWARE HEAD OF A MAN

LATE KOFUN PERIOD (6TH-7TH CENTURY)

细节
A HANIWA EARTHENWARE HEAD OF A MAN
LATE KOFUN PERIOD (6TH-7TH CENTURY)
The hair tied up as two buns forming a half-moon shape, wearing a bead decorated thick necklace, the results of the report on Thermoluminescence Analysis no. N123k56 obtained by the Research Laboratory for Archaeology and the History of Art, Oxford University, are consistent with the dating of this lot
10 ¼ in. (26 cm.) high
来源
Private Collection, Japan

荣誉呈献

Takaaki Murakami (村上高明)
Takaaki Murakami (村上高明) Vice President, Specialist and Head of Department | Korean Art

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拍品专文

Haniwa, "clay ring," take their name from the cylinders found in large tomb mounds as funerary objects for the Japanese elite families, beginning in the fourth century. Made of unglazed clay by the wazumi (coil and slab) technique, the tubular base of the hollowed pillar is sunk into the ground for stability. In the subsequent centuries, potters expanded the earthen cylinders into sculptures of humans, animals and household items. For an identical example, see Tokyo National Museum accession number J-8439 (the head part), excavated from Kashiwa City in Chiba Prefecture.

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